Brad Wardell's views about technology, politics, religion, world affairs, and all sorts of politically incorrect topics.
Published on July 14, 2009 By Draginol In Politics

http://hotair.com/archives/2009/07/07/state-run-health-care-by-the-numbers/

Great article.


Comments (Page 2)
on Jul 19, 2009

Are the Americans here saying that if you want to have non-urgent surgery in the US (eg hip replacement for the sake of comparison), your general practitioner will refer you, your private insurer will sign off on it and you'll have it done in a few days? Or is there an unofficial waiting period?

With rare exceptions, the 'wait' here simply involves matching the schedules of the patient, the surgeon and the operating room - unless there's a vacation or other previous commitment on the part of either the surgeon or the patient, 2 weeks or less would be typical.

Isn't that a problem though with the American political system, rather than single-payer healthcare? Most other countries' health systems work to budgets, which are largely spelt out in Federal/State Budgets and then their progress tracked through Annual Reports.

Yes, it's a problem here, but not particularly a reason to prefer single-payer - just a reflection of the political deviousness of our so-called 'public servants'.

on Jul 19, 2009

With rare exceptions, the 'wait' here simply involves matching the schedules of the patient, the surgeon and the operating room - unless there's a vacation or other previous commitment on the part of either the surgeon or the patient, 2 weeks or less would be typical.

Fair enough. The average wait for elective surgery in Australia is 34 days, with the slowest place (Canberra) at 74 days. A warts and all Australian health institute report can give you an idea of how a public/private system really works. I've linked to the press release, which is nice and short. We have a 60% public and 40% private system, so it's not quite UK-style, but although it's teetering in some places it seems to be working overall.

Yes, it's a problem here, but not particularly a reason to prefer single-payer - just a reflection of the political deviousness of our so-called 'public servants'.

As a public servant, I take offence at the insinuation that we're devious. We're simply opaque both in method and purpose, and you can blame your politicians for demanding that.

on Jul 19, 2009

The public servants I was referring to are the political variety, not the civil variety. 

Nonetheless, at least here, it seems many 'civil' servants take a certain perverse joy in frustrating the folks what pays their salary.

on Jul 23, 2009

if this is going to be soo good I want my politicans to go to the same doctors that I do and get the same care they are forcing on me...

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