Brad Wardell's views about technology, politics, religion, world affairs, and all sorts of politically incorrect topics.
Published on September 30, 2009 By Draginol In Politics

“Any human being, who accepts help from another, knows that good will is the giver’s only motive and that good will is the payment he owes in return.” –Hank Rearden

It has been my experience whether it be at the nation-state level or on a personal level that good will distributed freely is often returned with disdain and contempt.


Comments
on Sep 30, 2009

Good will is what you feel about others, not what you think they should feel about you. ;~D

on Sep 30, 2009

I think I remember reading somewhere that from an evolutionary standpoint when A gives something to B, A is showing superiority to B in that A is better off than B and B therefore submits to A (often times an alpha male will be charitable to the others in the pack).  This can all be done subconsciously of course, but that could be why the receiver might show disdain for the giver, because of the acknowledgement that A seems to be 'superior'.

on Sep 30, 2009

It has been my experience whether it be at the nation-state level or on a personal level that good will distributed freely is often returned with disdain and contempt.

Couldn't agree more. One too many times have I been the giver only to have the receiver give back pain and suffering. Talk about appreciation.

Good will is what you feel about others, not what you think they should feel about you.

That may be true, but there is a real reason people do things for others. They expect the good will to transfer to the receiver and hope the receiver forwords this good will to others. Whether it makes me happy to help someone seems kinda pointless when one does not see the good will spread and one does not see those who receive the good will appreciate what was done for them. I have reached a point in my life where my good will has limits now and while I hate to limit it I have learned the hard way (real hard way) that it's sometimes not worth even trying for my personal sake and safety.

I think I remember reading somewhere that from an evolutionary standpoint when A gives something to B, A is showing superiority to B in that A is better off than B and B therefore submits to A (often times an alpha male will be charitable to the others in the pack). This can all be done subconsciously of course, but that could be why the receiver might show disdain for the giver, because of the acknowledgement that A seems to be 'superior'.

If this is true then it should not be called Good Will, it should be called Superior Will.

on Sep 30, 2009

If this is true then it should not be called Good Will, it should be called Superior Will

Often is. I guess there is a mixed feeling of wanting to feel good about yourself, both on the generosity side (and those "poor people") and on the social superiority side. Which is why there is so much gifts granted in rich societies...

Or even in less-than-rich societies. You know, the little people who likes to feel big.

on Sep 30, 2009

It has been my experience whether it be at the nation-state level or on a personal level that good will distributed freely is often returned with disdain and contempt.

On a personal level I found the system works more often than it does not. But on a nation-state level I realise that the reward for good will is usually indeed contempt.

 

on Sep 30, 2009

Often is. I guess there is a mixed feeling of wanting to feel good about yourself, both on the generosity side (and those "poor people") and on the social superiority side. Which is why there is so much gifts granted in rich societies... Or even in less-than-rich societies. You know, the little people who likes to feel big.

I have to say it is strange for my countrymen to want a system that believes you are innocent till proven guilty, for selfish reasons, yet as far as the average person goes you are guilty till they deem you innocent. That is why Good Will is often met with disdain and contempt. Very few people believe some people will actually do things expecting nothing more than a thank you or to see those they give to enjoy it.

I like fixing computers. I enjoys cleaning out viruses, reinstalling Windows, taking computers apart and putting them back together. Because I only have a couple of PCs and I always keep them up to date and running as good as they can run, I don't get to do what I enjoy often. therefore I provide my services to family and friends, usually for free. I only take money if they offer and insist. But what do I get in return? Usually a thank you but nothing more. Do i expect something in return? Yes, I expect them to pass forward this "good will" I gave them, sometimes even pass it back. But it's frustrating when you try to show people how good it can be to help others only to have them take advantage of you just to save a few bucks. I've always said that so long as our society is dependent on money, people will always find ways to get something for little or nothing.

on Sep 30, 2009

At the nation-state level, what passes for good will is too often 1) generosity with other people's money, or 2) an assumption of ignorance/stupidity on the part of the recipient (incapable of making the 'right' choices), or 3) both.

Brings to mind a comment attributed to Michael Moore in another thread, in the context of healthcare reform and referring to our existing 'system': (as I remember it) 'No other western Democracy does this to its people.' (emphasis added).

And a comment by Mumble referring to another's analogy comparing our economy to a sow with too few teats: "I'd say that there are probably enough teats for all of the offspring it's just that some offspring take far more than they need leaving others to go without."

on Oct 01, 2009

y experience is that good will is always repaid, somehow.  Either physically, or spiritually, and that the spiritual realms extend a vast amount of breaks to people that have good intentions, and serve others. Even if we make mistakes in the process of doing that.

When you help others, you are actually helping yourself even if you don't percieve this.  It's the universal law of reciprocity.  Often I find that many people can be remarkably transformed by simple acts of kindness and love, sometimes it is all they want or need.  To know someone cares.

Before my self-realization I was quite hostile to people, always feeling people were against me. Now I know, I manifested those conditions in reciprocity for how I was acting to others. Now that kindness and good will is the order of the day, I find the most remarkable people show up to help - just when it is is needed. Sometimes defying all rational explanation.

One day I saw a lady trying to lift a heavy Dog Food Bag into her car. I ran over, lifted it in for her.  As I was driving away I saw the most incredible smile of happiness on her face, it sent reverberations through my body that are difficult to describe.  It's not always easy to see the reciprocity of these events, but I have had people jump up and open the door for me, carry my packages to my car, and other such things on a very regular basis.

Self Realization also brings the realization that we're not really different than the percieved other person, that we're all interconnected in a web of souls at the deepest level.  That outside of you are reflections of things inside of you, and problems outside of you, flaws in others, are in reality flaws or shortsighted aspects of yourself that need addressing. You've actually surrounded yourseld with people you need to learn from - as hard as that is to grasp.

You can prove these matters to yourself. Wake up each morning in a framework of Love. Carry that through the day, and examine what happens to you, the people that come around you, and the events that follow.  You must hold this feeling inwardly by thinking of situations that make you feel love for it to work.  Compare that day, with a normal day, and you will be surprised.  It isn't just your perception that changed, you actually changed your external environment by changing your resonance.  Realization that our external environment changes itself in respect to who we are is one of the hardest realizations people can understand because we've been conditioned that what happens to us is completely out of our control. This is a gross distortion perpetrated by people that want control.  Every single spiritual doctrine, texts, or theology in all of time says this in some way or another.

Everything you see happening is the consequence of that which you are.
Dr. Hawkins

All judgment reveals itself to be self-judgment in the end, and when this is understood a larger comprehension of the nature of life takes its place.
Dr. Hawkins

on Oct 01, 2009

Chuck:

That may be true, but there is a real reason people do things for others. They expect the good will to transfer to the receiver and hope the receiver forwords this good will to others. Whether it makes me happy to help someone seems kinda pointless when one does not see the good will spread and one does not see those who receive the good will appreciate what was done for them. I have reached a point in my life where my good will has limits now and while I hate to limit it I have learned the hard way (real hard way) that it's sometimes not worth even trying for my personal sake and safety.

Does good will to others come with demands?  "Paying it forward" is a great concept.  However, charity is supposed to be unconditional.  Nothing is supposed to be expected in return.  If you are doing service to others it shouldn't matter what the others do in return (including paying it forward).  It's like the people who get mad if someone doesn't thank them for their service.  They have to ask themselves, were they doing it out of charity, or were they doing it to be thanked?

Getting thanked, or seeing someone you have helped turn around and help others is wonderful, but it shouldn't be the motivating factor of service.  If it is then the person expecting it isn't much different than the person who expects the helped to get paid for services rendered.

 

on Oct 02, 2009

So true ParaTed,

Expectations of repayment for goodwill negate the heartfelt nature of the act itself.  In karmic terms, to do supposedly good karmic deeds for karmic payoff transfers the karma from a positive endeaver to a "Neutral" affair.  On the other hand, to do things in good heart, with compassion, yields positive karma.

Inside everyone knows each others intention as long as you aren't entrained to the point you lose your intuitive connectiveness. That is, your intentions broadcast your motivations.  That little old lady you help out each week probably knows you just want some of her inhertance, if that's your intention.

If you want nothing, expect nothing, you get quite a surprise when something arrives.  To hand a street bum $100, and think "Hah! You better enjoy that you filthy beggar, it's my hard earned money!"..  Well, essentially why bother?  You've accomplished nothing.  A person will never have true happiness or balance in life, if they don't have honest compassion for all beings. It's impossible, their suffering will continue until they have it, regardless of how many lifetimes it takes.  The reality is, nobody is better than anybody else. Money isn't power, it's force, spirit is power, a power that can move mountains. But to people entrained on materialistic science paradigms this level of power is inconcievable, and mythical.  To some people, it's an everyday reality and comes with a level of responsibility that most people couldn't imagine.   Money doesn't make someone better, wiser, or more authoritive than another person, and a gift of money doesn't automatically accord respect, nor karmic reward.  It's what is in your heart that counts.

So the smart brain must be balanced with a warm heart, a good heart--a sense of responsibility, of concern for the well-being of others.
Dalai Lama

on Oct 03, 2009

I think I remember reading somewhere that from an evolutionary standpoint when A gives something to B, A is showing superiority to B in that A is better off than B and B therefore submits to A (often times an alpha male will be charitable to the others in the pack). This can all be done subconsciously of course, but that could be why the receiver might show disdain for the giver, because of the acknowledgement that A seems to be 'superior'.

Richard Dawkins.

on Oct 07, 2009

It is a mistake to think money makes one superior, a horrid mistake.  It's also a mistake to think that people that don't appear to have money, or power, are in fact penniless and without power.  For many have entertained angels, unawares.

Life is about becoming a Bodhisattva, only then can you attain harmony. Thich Nhat Hanh wrote a book called "The Art of Power" that shows us only true power comes from attaining enlightenment, and that the expression of that power makes us a Bodhisattva.

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2009/09/11/assignment_america/main5304591.shtml

Generosity – How does one become more generous? Is it possible to rid oneself of materialistic tendencies, selfishness and a desire to want to be kind to others and give to those who lack? Being able to provide for people by starting a business and then hiring those who need jobs would be profitable not only for yourself but for those who were previously unemployed. Volunteering your time and talents to those who need them is also a way of cultivating generosity. To share Buddhist teachings so people are able to help themselves and in turn, others, is the finest gift you can offer. You have created a positive ripple effect. The ripples of the teachings will travel far and wide to allow many to be assisted.

The attitude behind your generosity is of the utmost importance; giving with anger or the desire for payment isn’t a good motivation. But if you have a humble motivation to help, then you’re on your way to become a Bodhisattva.

 

It doesn't take money to be a Bodhisattva, although it helps.  For example this man is a true Bodhisattva, and doesn't really have much other than his own body.  He gives more than probably many hundres of millionaires combined because his gift is through love and compassion, with no desire to control.  As a result, God rewards him - such as the reward of reuniting with his long lost daughter.  Of course, all of these events are "Orchestrated" by a higher power, that's pretty undeniable to anyone with basic spiritual connectivity.

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2009/09/11/assignment_america/main5304591.shtml

So the CEO of a company can either be just a paycheck to his employees, or he can be a Bodhisattva.

 

 

 

on Oct 07, 2009

Oops, I meant to post this link:

http://www.essortment.com/all/whatisbodhisat_rfld.htm

What is Bodhisattva?

on Oct 31, 2009

Corporate good will is usually built up by phony testimonials and sleazy advertising, rather than actually proving a company's true worthiness. 

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